Category: foods

Tazieh

Tazieh

Posted By : mehdi rafiei/ 473 0

It is a kind of traditional Iranian religious theater, performed on the occasion of the martyrdom of Hossein, grandson of the prophet Mohamed in Karbala in 681 AD.

These performances are intended to commemorate and share the pain of the drama, and the oppressions inflicted by Yazid, the son of Muawyia on the family of the Prophet.

It is a kind of traditional Iranian religious theater, performed on the occasion of the martyrdom of Hossein, grandson of the prophet Mohamed in Karbala in 681 AD.
These performances are intended to commemorate and share the pain of the drama, and the oppressions inflicted by Yazid, the son of Muawyia on the family of the Prophet.
This style of performance originated in the Qajar era, in the 19th century, and is literally based on a tradition collected orally.
Some peculiarities that we find in each performance of this living scene:

– The spectacle sometimes lasts a whole day from morning until sunset or until the assassination of Hossein.

– All dialogue recounts the strong moments to the rhythm of litanies to sadden and make the spectators cry. Long texts sung in poetry are recited according to manuscripts kept by the actors.

– Normally the role of women is played by men veiled in black.

– The Imam and his companions (the oppressed) are dressed in green and the yazidi (the oppressors) in red.

– At midday, during prayer there is an intermission, lunch is provided for all the spectators, an ex-voto from generous donors.

– A whole orchestra of percussions and flutes accompany the show.

– An extra cavalry in charge of mounting a horse accompanied by music, turns around the stage on command.

– The staging is done live in full view of the spectators, there is no backstage.

Arranged marriage

Posted By : mehdi rafiei/ 470 0

Arranged marriage is a delicate question, often asked by travelers when visiting Iran, but a very cliché and often irrelevant topic for many Iranians.

Arranged marriages exist but represent only a small percentage of marriages in Iran.

Arranged marriage is a delicate question, often asked by travelers when visiting Iran, but a very cliché and often irrelevant topic for many Iranians.

Arranged marriages exist but represent only a small percentage of marriages in Iran.

 

Marriage is a kind of passage to adulthood and is essential if man want to position ourselves in society.
It is still a real institution.

But a problem arises thus: how do young people meet in Iran?
As co-education is prohibited at school from an early age, boys and girls evolve separately. There is therefore a glaring lack of contact.
The problems generated by this lack of diversity, this lack of knowledge of people of the opposite sex, cause a high number of divorces in Iranian society, one of the main challenges of which is the transition from a traditional society to a society modern.

Currently most marriages are based on personal choice.
Young people have the opportunity to meet and get to know each other in different forms: at the university which is a mixed space, through social networks which are widely used, through friends on the occasion of an outing or a party, in the street during a “dor-dor” where the boys flirt with the girls during a weekend drive.
Girls and boys, each in a different car, try their luck by driving around at night, to find a partner. The more luxurious the car, the higher the chances of success.
This causes heavy traffic at night on the main boulevards of the cities.
This “dor-dor” is one of the main hobbies of young people from the wealthy and middle classes, to get to know each other and start a relationship that could possibly lead to a marriage!
Window down, a phone number exchange at a red light, from the boys ‘car to the girls’ car parked next door, a nice smile from some and a flirtatious attitude from the others and off we go …

..a date at the cafe and an invitation to dinner, if the magic of love operates … if not, we do another round!

Pleasure of Iranians, traveler’s nightmare

Posted By : mehdi rafiei/ 472 0

Traditionally the Iranians eat on the floor,

by installing a tablecloth and putting the cutlery on the carpet, in the main room of the house.

Traditionally the Iranians eat on the floor, by installing a tablecloth and putting the cutlery on the carpet, in the main room of the house.
Although the table has found its place in the daily comfort of Iranian homes, the pleasure of eating on the floor subsists and remains a beautiful tradition to be perpetuated.
The opening of many traditional restaurants in the old towns that offer this possibility is enjoying unprecedented success. The rooms of the old traditional residences are furnished, painted and often decorated with a mirror, transformed into private living rooms. It is an ideal choice for families and especially for honeymooners who seek more privacy, which allows women to be more comfortable enjoying their meals, by slightly removing their hijab.
These restaurants are very popular with travelers, curious to discover the art of living and the taste of local gastronomy through this traditional way of eating with family or in groups.
But once you ask them to take off their shoes and sit on the floor, that’s another story!

Bread

Bread, the staple food

Posted By : mehdi rafiei/ 485 0

For thousands of years, wheat bread has been the staple food of people living in the Iranian plateau.

Despite the introduction of several new food ingredients, it still is the most abundant food on the table and accounts, on average, for 70% of daily caloric intake.

For thousands of years, wheat bread has been the staple food of people living in the Iranian plateau. Despite the introduction of several new food ingredients, it still is the most abundant food on the table and accounts, on average, for 70% of daily caloric intake. This is why Iranians consider bread as god’s blessing and wasting it is quite unacceptable.
Generally, there are two major baking methods: oven or tray. The former is mostly used in cities and villages and the latter among nomads.
There are four main types of bread in the cities: Taftan, Lavash, Sangak, and Barbari. The first two are thin and flatbread and are the most consumed within Iranian Society due to their more reasonable prices. But if you are looking for the most popular, you should ask for Sangak. The leavened dough is made from specially milled flour. It is baked in an oven consisting of a sloping brick shelf covered with red-hot pebbles (literary means Sangak), which leave their imprints on the bread. You can also ask for sesame, nigella seeds, or herbs to be added to the dough before baking, for an extra amount of money.
Don’t forget to remove the left pebbles and cool the bread before putting it inside a plastic bag.